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Carotid Stenting

Severe carotid artery disease (a build-up of plaque in the walls of the carotid arteries) can obstruct blood supply to the head, increasing the risk of stroke. One option for treating this problem is to implant a stent—a metal mesh tube that permanently holds open the artery. A tiny balloon is used to push out the artery walls in a process known as angioplasty; then the balloon is removed and the stent is inserted. Both the angioplasty and implantation of the stent are normally performed via a catheter—a thin, flexible tube threaded through the blood vessels. The stent springs open when in place. Carotid stenting is usually performed as an inpatient procedure, and can be done under general anesthetic or while the patient is awake.

Why Temple?

Temple has some of the most extensive endovascular facilities in the region. We are leaders in endovascular techniques, which help minimize discomfort and may allow for faster recovery.