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Aortic Valve Stenosis Diagnosis

When diagnosing aortic valve stenosis, a physician will start with your personal and family medical history. You will also undergo a physical exam as well as tests to measure how well your heart is working. These can include any of the following: 

  • Chest X-ray is a non-invasive test that takes pictures of the heart and lungs; these can help the doctor determine if there’s a problem that is causing chest pain.
     
  • Echocardiogram is a non-invasive test using ultrasound (sound waves) and a device called a transducer — which is placed on the surface of the chest — to create a moving picture of the heart. This test provides views of the valve opening and heart chambers; it can show if the valve is leaking and if there are problems with pumping.
     
  • Transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) uses sound waves (ultrasound) to create detailed pictures of your heart and arteries. Unlike echocardiogram, TEE uses a probe that is passed through the mouth and into the esophagus. This provides a better picture because the esophagus is right behind the heart and the probe does not have to penetrate the chest wall in the ribs and lungs to get a clear picture.
     
  • Heart catheterization is used to detect abnormalities of the heart valves, heart function and coronary arteries. This procedure uses a catheter (long thin flexible tube) that is inserted through a blood vessel in the wrist, leg, arm or neck to measure the pressure of blood in the heart chambers, take blood samples or view heart structures (using contrast dye).
     
  • Electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) is a simple non-invasive test that can be done in the doctor’s office using small adhesive pads called electrodes that are placed on the arms, legs, and chest. These electrodes are connected to a machine that detects and prints out the heart's electrical impulses, giving a 10-second snapshot of what the heart is doing right at that moment.